BCC ONLINE SUNDAY SCHOOL: TOGETHER WITH AFRICA


BCC recently sent an online Sunday school episode from Africa. A cooperation between BCC’s media department and several local churches resulted in this lovely sending for children. Watch the full episode here.


By Ulrikke Andresen – Photo: BCC

Over the whole world, there are currently restrictions for both local churches, and children and youth groups, to meet together. Fortunately, online Sunday school has opened up new opportunities for children, and portrayal of BCC’s international diversity is clearer than ever.

Recently there was a Sunday School broadcast in Africa, where local churches had prepared a varied program with a distinct cultural touch. Children from many different parts of Africa contributed. The episode included dance, song, and inspiring films where the theme is Jesus is a Helper, strength, and support in every day life.

Watch the episode here:

Exciting to convey to a young audience

“I think the children felt it was fun to be along, especially in the songs, dance, and rhythm sections. You can see it in their faces”, says Grethe Slabbert, the Project Manager for this episode.

South Africa made the studio and designed the script themselves, and together with other African churches produced the film and song elements. The episode had short segments to make is easier for children to follow along. The sending was both lively and captivating with children and young people as the contributors.

“To convey the gospel in a format that suits a young audience has been an exciting project. It was both instructive and interesting for us to work together with BCC Media on this project. We received good tips during the process of how to make the episode suit to the target audience”, says Grethe Slabbert.

Swipe to see pictures from the episode:

Cooperation across country borders

Elise Schøll

“The international Sunday school episodes has been possible because of a large local effort, and feedback shows appreciation for these types of coordinated productions. There are more than a few that have expressed that these projects are enriching their everyday lives during this time when normal activities are on hold”, says Elise Schøll, manager for the children’s TV productions.

So far, in addition to productions sent from Norway, there has also been Sunday school episodes from the Netherlands, Germany, and Africa. BCC’s media department says that the experiences have been successful and they have plans to continue international productions.

BCC Media provides guidelines along with the animated films for these cooperative productions. This makes it easier for the local churches, who do everything on a voluntary basis. In addition, BCC Media is available to give tips and to be used a resource. Before sending episodes, BCC Media adds final touches to the sound, picture, and graphic elements so that the technical quality delivered is top standard.

Dubbing provides better understanding

Volunteers in several countries are involved with translating and dubbing the content so that the viewers from many nationalities can understand the content as clearly as possible. The team delegated for translating and dubbing works every week both with translation of text and with sound files for programs. The program, dubbed in 14 different languages, is an increase in the number of languages available since this summer.

READ: Children’s program goes online in 12 languages

Grethe explains that dubbing the program means a lot for children in the local churches:

“Early on, there was translation simultaneously, making it difficult for children to concentrate. With dubbing, it is much easier to follow along and understand the content”, she says. “Then the actuality that children can use what they have heard in their everyday life is higher.”

BCC Media has its own Youtube channel, both in Norwegian and English. There is sharing of Sunday school episodes, music, and short films on this channel for anyone who wants to use this content as a resource in their Christian work with children and young people.

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